UN climate report; Kellogg supply issues; etc.

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Adobe Stock The Associated Press reported on Monday that Earth’s temperatures are expected to blow past a level of warming that world leaders wanted to prevent, according to a report released by the United Nations. The UN called the report a “code red for humanity.” The report found […]


Adobe Stock

The Associated Press reported on Monday that Earth’s temperatures are expected to blow past a level of warming that world leaders wanted to prevent, according to a report released by the United Nations.

The UN called the report a “code red for humanity.” The report found that the world will pass the 1.5-degree-Celsius warming mark in the 2030s, earlier than past predictions. Warming has accelerated in recent years.

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“Our report shows that we need to be prepared for going into that level of warming in the coming decades. But we can avoid further levels of warming by acting on greenhouse gas emissions,” Valerie Masson-Delmotte, the report’s co-chair, told the AP.

Workers reach agreement with Canada Border Services Agency

The Canada Border Services Agency and its union workers reached an agreement Friday night, ending labor actions that began Friday morning, Supply Chain Dive reported. Friday morning, union workers at Canadian ports began labor actions that would have them doing their jobs strictly as outlined in contracts.

It threatened to cause delays for commercial traffic at Canadian ports. The “work-to-rule” actions came during ongoing contract negotiations and involved nearly 9,000 employees.

These actions threatened to “have a dramatic impact on Canada’s supply chain and the government’s plans to reopen the border to US travelers on Aug. 9,” the Public Service Alliance of Canada and the Customs and Immigration Union said in a joint news release Wednesday.

Kellogg sees supply shortages

Every Kellogg factory around the world has been hit by supply shortages because of a range of disruptions, according to the website Bakery and Snacks.

CEO Steve Cahillane told analysts on a conference call that the impact of supply chain issues remains severe. Issues like a lack of shipping pallets to a shortage of truck drivers have put pressure on the amount of goods companies can produce. Several lines, like Frosted Flakes cereal, Eggo waffles and Morningstar Farms have been affected.

“We continue to supply the world with food, though, this remains challenging as the pandemic persists. A re-acceleration of COVID-19 cases has brought on new restrictions, causing temporary shutdowns of production in some countries. Meantime, we and the vendors that supply us are having to manage through bottlenecks and shortages of materials, labor and freight, all created by demand-supply imbalances that are also pushing up costs,” Cahillane said, Bakery and Snacks reported.

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